Chinese Hot Pots

Every Asian country has its own version of noodle soup. Actually, EVERY country I can think of has a signature noodle soup! China alone, has hundreds of variations based on regional culture and resources. In China soups are thought to hold healing properties and noodles are a system of longevity. A noodle soup is therefore taken very seriously, as are most dishes!

Chinese culture offers a large amount of respect for the foods they eat; a lost tradition American culture is slowly beginning to regain. Regional cuisines are highly respected and noted for their culinary and health-related attributes. Children are taught early on, how to prepare traditional dishes, some that have been around for thousands of years.

I spent the summer after high school in China studying Chinese history, Mandarin Chinese, and the Uighur language spoken widely in the North Western Chinese province of Xinjiang We spent a great deal of our free time with Chinese college students who were eager to befriend “the foreigners” and brush up on their English.

These friends introduced me to classic hot pots, a method of making soup in which you gently cook raw veggies in your serving bowl by pouring hot broth over the top, and allowing them to steep. Hot pots are a fun interactive meal that allow each individual to personalize their bowl with favorite ingredients and spice.

Bean thread noodles are made solely out of mung bean sprouts, therefore making this a gluten-free dish. It also fits easily into Tim Ferriss‘ “Slow Carb Diet” because the noodles add very few carbs per bowl.

In a large pot, bring the chicken stock, water, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, ginger and garlic to a boil.

Add the chicken and simmer for 5-7 minutes, until just cooked through. Add the noodles. Stir, then cover and remove from heat.

Meanwhile chop all the veggies and place in serving bowls.

When ready to serve, allow each person to fill their bowls with fresh vegetables and a bit of chile sauce.

Then ladle the scalding hot soup over the veggies and let them sit for 5 minutes.

Mix and eat! Makes 6-8 bowl of soup.

Print
Print

Yield: 6+

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Chinese Hot Pots

Ingredients:

6 cups chicken stock
6 cups water
½ cup rice vinegar
1/3 cup soy sauce
1 ½ Tb. sesame oil
3-5 slices of fresh ginger
3-5 garlic cloves, cracked
1 lb. boneless chicken thighs, thinly sliced
5 oz. bean thread noodles, or rice stick noodles
1 large bunch of green onions
1 ½ cup mung bean sprouts
8 oz. mushrooms, any variety
4 baby bok choy
Chile-garlic paste

Directions:

In a large pot, bring the chicken stock, water, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, ginger and garlic to a boil. Add the chicken and simmer for 5-7 minutes, until just cooked through. Add the noodles. Stir, then cover and remove from heat.

Meanwhile chop all the veggies and place in serving bowls.

When ready to serve, allow each person to fill their bowls with fresh vegetables and a bit of chile sauce.

Then ladle the scalding hot soup over the veggies and let them sit for 5 minutes.

Mix and eat!

Related Posts

71 Responses to “Chinese Hot Pots”

  1. #
    51
    Parsley Sage — August 8, 2011 @ 4:32 pm

    These are fantastic! I love Chinese hot pot and how lucky are you to have gotten to spend some time there studying up :) Lovely recipe, lovely post!

    Reply

  2. #
    52
    Laura @ SweetSavoryPlanet — September 4, 2011 @ 9:23 am

    We have friends from China and Taiwan who love to have dinner parties and serve this. It is so much fun, basically easy and quite the variety of food. And healthy!

    Reply

  3. #
    53
    daksha — November 8, 2011 @ 8:14 pm

    I like this type of noodles and beans soup. it’s taste amazing.

    Reply

  4. #
    54
    Priscilla M — April 16, 2012 @ 11:14 am

    Flavor fiesta! And the pictures are divine!

    Reply

  5. #
    55
    Juice — September 18, 2012 @ 10:41 pm

    I made this tonight and it was sooooo yummy! The only thing I changed was I cooked the noodles separately so I can just heat up the broth and have it tomorrow without the noodles getting soggy. It’s definitely become one of my favorites. Thank you!!

    Reply

  6. #
    56
    Laura (Tutti Dolci) — October 16, 2012 @ 9:57 am

    I love hot pots! When I spent time in China, this was one of my favorite dinners. I loved the interaction!

    Reply

  7. #
    57
    Parsley Sage — October 20, 2012 @ 1:27 pm

    Oooooh! I love me some hot pots! I keep meaning to sort myself out so we can do these at our house. Yours looks super yummy :)

    Reply

  8. #
    58
    Diets — December 5, 2012 @ 11:58 pm

    Should i use some other oil instead of sesame oil? Otherwise the whole recipe is just full nutrition.
    .

    Reply

    • Sommer — December 6th, 2012 @ 7:08 am

      You can use any oil you prefer. :)

      Reply

  9. #
    59
    Monet — January 25, 2013 @ 12:12 pm

    What an amazing experience that must have been…and now you’re sharing part of it (a very delicious part) with us! Thank you for inspiring me!

    Reply

  10. #
    60
    Sika — May 11, 2013 @ 11:54 am

    I like hot pots, thank you for this great recipe!

    Reply

  11. #
    61
    Dan from Platter Talk — June 24, 2013 @ 11:12 am

    This is such a tasty looking post! I would love to try something like this some day, soon. Thanks for sharing this!!

    Reply

  12. #
    62
    Monica — April 2, 2014 @ 2:32 pm

    What a nice post. I’m Chinese and we do enjoy hot pots. : ) Your version looks scrumptious.

    Reply

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: Chinese Broccoli Beef | The Shiksa Blog

  2. Pingback: Chinese Chicken Soup | Foodography

  3. Pingback: 15 Soul Warming Spicy Soup Recipes

  4. Pingback: Chinese Hot Pots | Cascade Mountain Gifts

  5. Pingback: 5 Spicy soup recipes perfect for the cold winter days - Exquisite Girl

  6. Pingback: Asian Soups That Go Way Beyond Ramen | Gymrat Fitness

Leave a Comment