Eco-Ceviche

Fresh Swai Ceviche with Blue Corn Chips…

Seafood is one of my favorite things to eat. It’s a mini-thrill for me to find a new variety for kitchen experimentation! I often go to a certain “organic” market and browse the seafood counter, lured by their diverse selection. I slowly float down the case. Eyes wide. Breezing over the glistening assortment, searching for inspiration. Almost giddy with anticipation, I feel as if I’m on a culinary scavenger hunt. I LOVE IT!

One particular store has little signs labeling the fish as: Sustainable, At-Risk, Endangered. I might get stoned for writing this, but I have to admit…this irritates me a little. These signs cast a dark shadow of guilt over my otherwise delightful fish-selecting process! Please understand, I’m not saying we should haphazardly consume whatever we please without care of consequence. I want to help sustain fish populations for the “greater good” of our ocean’s ecosystems. But why do these eco-friendly stores continue to offer them??? Why put lovely, delicious, ENDANGERED fish in front of me, only to give me dirty looks when I’m tempted to buy it? After all, it’s ALREADY DEAD, I can’t throw it back now! (This is the same store where the grocery clerk huffed and suspiciously glared at me the ONE time I forgot my reusable bags!) At the seafood counter, I’m like an eager little mouse sitting in front of a cheese-laden trap. Nose up, I cautiously sniff the insatiable aroma of bliss, mingled with danger. Paws slowly creep forward, as my mind fights to resist….SNAP! You might think I need a good hand-slap at this point, but I wish they would just stop catching endangered fish in the first place!

In all seriousness, I do my best to look the other way when I see the bluefin tuna and red snapper. In the last year, many of our stores have started carrying Swai or Basa, an eco-friendly and wallet-friendly white fish. If you haven’t tried it, I know what you’re thinking. Cheap fish tastes like…cheap fish. Yet this economical swimmer is surprisingly good!It’s an Asian variety of river catfish with a mild, slightly sweet essence. As a river fish, Swai doesn’t seem to have the “bottom-dweller” flavor of many catfish varieties. The most sustainable choice is farm-raised in America, and generally costs around $3.99 a pound. I recently bought it on sale for $1.99 a pound!

Ceviche (se-vee-chae) is one of those dishes we curious eaters often adore, while others find it a little daunting. A raw seafood salsa. Or more accurately, citrus-seared fish combined with veggies and herbs to create a light, yet robust concoction. For those who are leery, the acid in the lime juice sort-of cooks the fish over time, so you can feel adventurous eating “raw fish”  without any of the worry! Ceviche is scrumptious served over greens for a warm-weather salad or with tortilla chips as a protein-packed snack.

I like to make ceviche with rich seafood; scallops or seabass are personal favorites. But as we are all trying to be more responsible with our personal resources, as well as our global resources, Swai is a great alternative. It’s delicate, almost creamy texture gives it the semblance of a more luxurious catch!

I served this to friends last night who couldn’t get over the smooth flavor of this humble fish. Give it a try!

Preparation:

Place the diced fish into ¾ of the lime juice and refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Strain when ready to proceed.

Mix the veggies with the remaining lime juice.


Stir in the fish and cilantro. Drizzle with olive oil and add the chile-garlic sauce. Gently toss.

Salt and pepper to taste. Serve with tortilla chips or a salad.

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Yield: 6-8 servings

Fresh and Simple Swai Ceviche

Ingredients:

3 Swai fillets, diced (about 1 lb.)
2 limes, juiced
1 tomato, diced
1 avocado, diced
1 shallot, diced (or ¼ cup red onion)
1 Tb. chopped cilantro
Olive oil
¼- ½ tsp chile-garlic paste
Salt and pepper

Directions:

Place the diced fish into ¾ of the lime juice and refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Strain when ready to proceed.

Mix the veggies with the remaining lime juice.

Stir in the fish and cilantro. Drizzle with olive oil and add the chile-garlic sauce. Gently toss.

Salt and pepper to taste. Serve with tortilla chips or a salad.

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10 Responses to “Eco-Ceviche”

  1. #
    1
    penny aka jeroxie — April 20, 2010 @ 4:15 am

    This is such a beautiful dish. love the purple corn chips!

    Reply

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    Devaki — April 20, 2010 @ 6:23 am

    Dear Sommer – What fantastic flavors with the fish and the fresh cilantro, onions, tomatoes and cilantro! Beautiful pics as usual too.

    Love the pairing with the blue corn tortilla chip.

    I would love a glass of that now – even though its 11.00pm!

    Ciao, Devaki @ weavethousandflavors

    Reply

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    3
    Casey Angelova — April 20, 2010 @ 10:58 am

    You make an excellent point about the endangered fish and the signs. They should just not carry them or provide alternatives. There is an awesome TED video with Dan Barber called How I Fell In Love With A Fish. A must watch for those interested in sustainable fish. Here is the link: http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_barber_how_i_fell_in_love_with_a_fish.html
    Check it out!

    Reply

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    4
    Lazaro Cooks! — April 20, 2010 @ 5:21 pm

    Beautiful dish. Great color, flavor combination, and presentation.

    As a person who has studied and written extensively on the subject. I am not going to get into the topic of supporting sustainable fish in a blog comment. Suffice to say that, I agree with you in the sentient that these retail stores need to make a decision. Either support sustainable fish or not. Get off the fence. I do not buy fish that is endangered, and do not support restaurants that serve them. But it seems like the store you are talking about has one-foot in one-foot out.

    Reply

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    laura — April 21, 2010 @ 2:02 am

    I'm not familiar with Swai – now I will be on the lookout! You inspire me to be more adventurous with seafood – Bri is not a huge fan, so I often pass it up, but I love seafood and really should make this regardless – all the more for me! The flavors sound perfect and it looks beautiful!

    Reply

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    sweetlife — April 21, 2010 @ 2:14 am

    what a wonderful dish..great for a party..love the blue chips

    sweetlife

    Reply

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    7
    PFx — April 21, 2010 @ 6:22 am

    As I sat here eating my canned tuna, I stopped and crave for your ceviche. I think I have to bin this tuna and head off for the fishmonger. Such a fresh looking meal you've got there Sommer.

    Reply

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    Ann — April 21, 2010 @ 1:31 pm

    Excellent, Sommer! Thanks for the helpful tip about Swai. I absolutely LOVE Ceviche but have always been a little daunted to try it myself. Thanks for the inspiration!

    Reply

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    9
    4under3 — April 27, 2010 @ 6:44 pm

    Ummmm, Yum!

    My first experience with Ceviche was almost 2 years ago in Costa Rica. It was love at first taste. I can't wait to try this recipe. Thanks Sommer!

    Tiff

    Reply

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